Reading
American Gods by Neil Gaiman. Other random books people give me but idk.
watching
Outlander, Parks and Recreation, other things??
playing
The Walking Dead Game, forever playing The Last of Us and Uncharted
slaying
currently slaying you bc you're looking at my updates ah yea boi
saying
caitlin; 24; los angeles; writer
+

thetox:

I find it interesting that in this new opening our two geniuses, Armin and Hanji, are both shown with their faces covered in blood. Armin clearly got the worst end of the stick, but notice that the only part of his face which isn’t covered with blood is his mouth. Meanwhile most of the blood on Hanji’s face is around hers.

What does this really symbolize, other than the fact that if they were to smash their faces together, they would be completely covered in red?

Armin’s segment of the opening is pretty straight forward in the symbolism. He is presented as the only shining light when all of the other candles have gone out; showing his brilliance, even when he is symbolically covered in blood. He can make the right choices even in moments of dread; simple, but effective imagery.

Meanwhile Hanji’s segment is less symbolic, and more straight forward of showing her personality. She is smiling at this moment, telling of her blood thirst. 

The blood patterns makes me think that this was a deliberate way of showing the differences between these two very intelligent characters. Armin is shown to be level headed, and Hanji is more spontaneous. Armin has a severe expression (in the next frame), and Hanji is excited.

I find it interesting that the anime team chose to display these differences and draw parallels between these two characters. Because Armin and Hanji are indeed very different characters, but there is one thing which they have in common; their intelligence. They act very differently, but are often thought to have the same thinking pattern.

It’s also interesting to note that the people they are the closest to - Eren and Levi respectively - are also very different characters, similar only in their desire to eradicate titans (showing a similar way of thinking at that end). And Eren is complementary to Armin by having the blood thirst of Hanji, whereas Levi is complementary to Hanji by having the calmness of Armin.

I am glad the anime made this comparison. 

Or that I have the ability to read waaaaay into things and show my Eren/Armin Levi/Hanji bias. 

cjwho:

New York

Museum of Modern Art facing W 54th Street
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made rebloggable

Hmm. I wouldn’t describe Jaime as immortal. In fact, I think Jaime pre whoops-i-lost-my-hand incident was at a low point if you really think about it. But being a Lannister, and kin to Tyrion, he wasn’t going to let his slandered nickname and the fact that he lives in a bullshit society get him down. I mean, all he needs is Cersei and a sword, right? His family, Cersei (I list her separately to indicate how important she is to him) and his ability to protect and fight for them is what he values most of all. Everything and one else can go fuck themselves. I mean he made an oath and sacrificed his heritage (a normal life pretty much) just so he could be near to Cersei. He pushed a small child out a window and was willing to kill another for Cersei’s sake (and i can’t remember if he or the Hound killed the butcher boy). Oh and he killed the god damn king to protect his father, and I wouldn’t doubt a second he’d kill for Tyrion. Yea, “what I do for love” is not a joke. It’s, uh, frightening.

The only thing Jaime has going for him pre-golden-hand is his skill as a swordsman. And when I say “what he’s got going for him” I mean that as in, “the only thing he feels that makes him useful” “the only thing he finds valuable in himself” “the only thing that keeps the shit away.” And so when he loses that hand, it’s not really a fall. It’s more like reality crashing into him. Suddenly the one thing he could threaten people with, the only thing he could use to defend all the shit that came his and his family’s way, is gone. For so long he’s been living in denial, playing the loose cannon, doing what he wants, BELIEVING it was better to laugh and flip the bird to the world than to actually face it.

But losing that hand, that value, he finds himself worthless. He claims he’d be better dead than alive. That’s not a loss of pride as numba one swordsman of Westeros, that’s a loss of hope. That’s despair. Finally after ignoring it, he has to face the fact that the only thing HE VALUED IN HIMSELF was his ability to fight, and now it’s gone. And losing the wall that protected him, he has no choice to but to face how much being called Kingslayer bugs him, that he’s sacrificed so much for others and received so little in return (I also think he yearns to be used too. He believes it’s teh only thing people respect and value in him thus why HE values it so god damn much).

Jaime didn’t spiral. He’d spiraled downward some time ago. Losing his hand forced him to see the truth about himself (and eventually the truth about his family).

and those would be my thoughts on Jaime Lannister’s “downward spiral.”

creese:

“Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe” by Michael Creese

there is an empty place within me where my heart was once